Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

 

Oh happy day! Hemming curved edges doesn't have to be a headache when you use this simple sewing secret.Have you ever been frustrated by attempts at hemming curved edges? I know I have. You work so hard to get the whole garment looking good then you attempt to hem the curved edge and it just doesn’t want to cooperate. And if you want a nice wide hem–forget it. You end up with bunching and it’s hard to get it to look good. UNLESS….you use this secret for hemming curved edges and then you’ll get a nice smooth hem (and it can be a wide one) without all the frustration!

Are you ready to learn the secret? It’s creating a facing! Keep reading, and I’ll show you exactly how to do it.

Creating a Facing to Hem Curved Edges (Hemming Curved Edges)

  1. Look in your pattern to see how much of a seam allowance is allowed. Let’s say it allows for a 1″ hem. So you’d cut your pattern 1″ shorter than the pattern calls for. Then sew up your dress until you get to the hemming part.
  2. Now take your pattern and cut a facing using the hemline of the pattern to the height you want it. Finish one edge with either a zigzag stitch of a serger.The Secret to Hemming Curved Edges Perfectly | Mabey She Made It #hemming #sewing #sewingtips
  3. Sew your facing pieces together at the side seams, then pin the facing to the garment (right sides and raw edges together). Now stitch around the whole hemline. The Secret to Hemming Curved Edges Perfectly | Mabey She Made It #hemming #sewing #sewingtips
  4. Flip the facing to the inside of the garment and press so you have a nice clean hemline. Then either machine or hand stitch the facing in place and you’re done!The Secret to Hemming Curved Edges Perfectly | Mabey She Made It #hemming #sewing #sewingtips

Because the facing is the exact same shape as the garment, you won’t have any bunching and everything should lay perfectly flat, eliminating the headache and frustration of hemming a curved edge. It’s totally worth the added step–especially when you have a really big curved edge like on this maxi skirt. I started to hem it without the facing, and was so mad I almost gave up until I remembered to use this secret.

If you liked this tutorial, you might also like:

The Secret to Gorgeous Gathers | Mabey She Made It #gatheringfabric #sewing #sewingtipsLengthening a Dress | Mabey She Made It | #sewing #lengtheningadress #tutorial

The Secret to Gorgeous Gathers || Lengthening a Dress

And check out the dress pattern review here:

The Georgia Twirl dress is a simple, cute style with full circle skirt for maximum twirl factor. Pattern review by Mabey She Made It

Georgia Twirl Dress

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

38 Comments on The Secret to Hemming Curved Edges

  1. Tami
    Saturday, April 12, 2014 at 11:05 AM (3 years ago)

    Thanks for a great idea. I have just gotten back into sewing (and didn’t know that much 20 years ago) so all of these tutorials are great for newbies like me.

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Sunday, April 13, 2014 at 9:52 PM (3 years ago)

      Hi Tami, Thanks for your comment! I hope you enjoy getting back into sewing and trying out a few ideas!

      Reply
  2. Marti
    Sunday, April 13, 2014 at 8:18 AM (3 years ago)

    Thanks for the tip and for sharing it with us at Show-licious Craft and Recipe party!

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Sunday, April 13, 2014 at 9:50 PM (3 years ago)

      I’ve learned so much from other seamstresses through blogs, and when I learn something new I love sharing!

      Reply
  3. Erika
    Thursday, April 17, 2014 at 6:46 AM (3 years ago)

    This is awesome! I have tried to hem a circle skirt a few times and it was so frustrating. The last time I used bias tape, and it took forever! I am doing this trick next. Thanks for the tip.

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:23 PM (3 years ago)

      It’s seriously frustrating without this method! You’ll love how easily your next project goes–it’s so worth the extra step!

      Reply
    • Lisa
      Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:20 PM (3 years ago)

      It’s amazing the difference it makes on a curve. Totally worth the extra step!

      Reply
  4. Erin S.
    Friday, April 18, 2014 at 9:41 PM (3 years ago)

    Such a great tip. I’ll have to remember this the next time I sew a circle skirt!

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:20 PM (3 years ago)

      Hopefully it helps you Erin!

      Reply
  5. Linda
    Thursday, May 15, 2014 at 9:04 AM (3 years ago)

    After you sew on the hem facing, do you then hem it?

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Thursday, May 15, 2014 at 2:37 PM (3 years ago)

      Hi Linda, after sewing on the facing, you then either machine or hand stitch the facing to the back side of the main fabric. I promise the extra step is worth it though!

      Reply
  6. carolyn
    Friday, June 6, 2014 at 2:36 PM (3 years ago)

    makes perfect sense… thanks for sharing!

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Monday, June 9, 2014 at 8:32 AM (3 years ago)

      Thank you, Carolyn!

      Reply
    • Lisa
      Monday, June 9, 2014 at 8:20 AM (3 years ago)

      Thanks for sharing your link, Kathy! That looks a like a great method for small hems.

      Reply
  7. Nky
    Wednesday, July 9, 2014 at 11:01 AM (3 years ago)

    What an ingenious idea! If only if read this last night before I ruined the neckline of the dress I was making…

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Monday, July 14, 2014 at 3:26 PM (3 years ago)

      You’ll have to give it a try sometime. Necklines are a great place for these!

      Reply
  8. Jill
    Tuesday, August 5, 2014 at 12:07 PM (3 years ago)

    Great tute! Thank you. I love this fabric..so much I made a dress from it a while back :) I still get many compliments on it when I wear it -I’m pretty sure it’s all about the print, lol!

    http://pinterest.com/pin/56998751508866247/

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Monday, August 11, 2014 at 10:23 AM (3 years ago)

      Isn’t it the best? I found it on a bolt end and bought all that was left. I still have some more to make something…just deciding what it should be!

      Reply
  9. Mayra K
    Wednesday, August 20, 2014 at 5:09 PM (3 years ago)

    I made a cape for my Mom 6 months ago, and I haven’t finished because I’m too lazy to do the hem! Is it possible to just cut the fabric meant for the hem and do this process? Will it work?

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Wednesday, August 20, 2014 at 11:31 PM (3 years ago)

      If you cut off the bottom (what you would have hemmed) you could probably do this technique by laying it on top of the cape bottom and making them the same shape but it would depend on the shape of the cape.

      Reply
  10. Mary longren
    Friday, September 26, 2014 at 6:54 PM (3 years ago)

    I would edge stitch on the facing close to the seam allowance before sewing the final stitches to the garment.

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Thursday, October 16, 2014 at 4:23 PM (3 years ago)

      Good idea, Mary!

      Reply
  11. Ria
    Friday, October 10, 2014 at 5:41 PM (3 years ago)

    How have I never this is pure genius

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Thursday, October 16, 2014 at 4:48 PM (3 years ago)

      It’s a sanity saver!

      Reply
  12. Laura
    Sunday, April 12, 2015 at 8:13 PM (2 years ago)

    OMG! Where has this been all my life?! I have been sewing for 40 years and have never seen this before! I have used a loose (like basting)stitch to pull up the fullness but you don’t get a nice flat hem that way. Thank you so much! Pinning and sharing!!

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Monday, April 20, 2015 at 9:43 PM (2 years ago)

      So simple and yet it isn’t common knowledge (yet)! I’m glad I could share something valuable. :)

      Reply
  13. Nicole
    Friday, January 15, 2016 at 6:47 PM (1 year ago)

    I seriously had this exact problem yesterday, making a pair of woven pyjama shorts from a pattern – the very first I’ve ever tried. I hemmed one leg (scalloped sides – what was I thinking???) then gave up in frustration on the other. With 4 kids underfoot & 2 rowdy dogs it took from 9.30am to 4.45pm, & 2 attempts on plain sheet offcuts. I was nearly in tears wrestling the thing, and contemplating whether I had enough patience to sew from a pattern. I still hadn’t even cut the fabric I eventually wanted to use! Also, your pattern weights, pinning was hideous. Thanks, you’ve saved my (very limited) sanity!!!

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Saturday, January 16, 2016 at 9:07 AM (1 year ago)

      Ugh, I’m so sorry you had such a frustrating day–that’s the worst! Hopefully this trick will make your next attempt much smoother. And pattern weights are the best!

      Reply
  14. Bunny
    Saturday, April 2, 2016 at 3:32 PM (1 year ago)

    Facings are wonderful for curved hems. However, I really don’t see how they have worked here. I see ripples in the hem area and the center back of the over skirt are at least an inch and a half apart. Something is just off with the cutting here, IMO.

    Reply
  15. GrandmaDonna
    Sunday, June 26, 2016 at 9:25 PM (12 months ago)

    I used this method (thought up myself) as an early sewer 60 yrs ago) on a very full square-dance dress. I used a 6″ diameter bowl, traced touching scollops for the skirt, then faced it. Below the scollops, I used a solid color piece, folded double to accent the scollops. Similar technique for yoke, but smaller scollops, of course. It was a real HIT!!! Loved making it AND wearing it!

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Saturday, July 23, 2016 at 10:44 AM (11 months ago)

      You’re a smart lady! And I would have loved to see you wear it. :)

      Reply
      • GrandmaDonna
        Saturday, July 23, 2016 at 10:55 AM (11 months ago)

        Thank you for your comment! Wish I knew how to send a drawing of it here; probably can’t find a photo. That was probably the first BIG project a I attempted at that stage of my early sewing years, but I really enjoyed the challenge, especially after I was told it was too much for me to even try. I was SO proud of how it turned out!

        Reply
  16. Jessica
    Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 9:16 AM (4 months ago)

    Would this trick work on knits as well? I am struggling to get my curved hems to lay flat and look nice! Thank you for the tutorial.

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Friday, February 24, 2017 at 9:24 AM (4 months ago)

      Yes! It totally works on knits too. Good luck!

      Reply
  17. Lyla
    Wednesday, March 15, 2017 at 7:15 PM (3 months ago)

    OMG! such an ingenious idea! I am a complete novice and of course the first project I chose is a dress that has curved hem. You can imagine how frustrating it was, I can’t even get straight hem yet, let alone do the curved hemming. This was such an amazing idea, even a complete beginner such myself could do it! Thank you so very much!

    Reply
    • Lisa
      Wednesday, May 3, 2017 at 1:35 PM (2 months ago)

      Yea! So glad to have helped. Curved hems are quite the beast if you are new to them.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment *